Apprenticeship

What is an Apprentice?
Apprentices have a long history dating back to ancient Greece when young workers entered a term of service, now called indenture-ship, to a skilled tradesman to learn his craft. Things are much the same today. Currently, an apprentice is an employee who learns a skilled trade through planned, supervised work on-the-job, while at the same time receiving related technical classroom instruction. Apprentices are required to sign an indenture agreement with their Joint Apprenticeship Committee/Trade Improvement Committee that spells out the requirements and expectations of an apprentice iron worker.

Apprentices are taught the proper use, care, and safe handling of the tools and equipment used in connection with their work and, of course, the important skills necessary to become a successful trades-person.

While working on-the-job and acquiring skills, apprentices are a regular part of the work force on whom contractors and co-workers rely. But remember that apprentices are also required to attend iron working school and complete the prescribed courses related to the trade in order to complement their on-the-job training. Apprentices will receive an evaluation about every 6 months to determine if they are learning the craft. If the on-the-job or schoolwork is not satisfactory, they may be dropped from the program or sent back to repeat that segment of training. If, however, the work is good they will receive a pay raise.

Do You Have What It Takes To Become An Iron Worker?  Click Here to find out if YOU Have What it Takes!!!

What is an Apprentice?
Apprentices have a long history dating back to ancient Greece when young workers entered a term of service, now called indenture-ship, to a skilled tradesman to learn his craft. Things are much the same today. Currently, an apprentice is an employee who learns a skilled trade through planned, supervised work on-the-job, while at the same time receiving related technical classroom instruction. Apprentices are required to sign an indenture agreement with their Joint Apprenticeship Committee/Trade Improvement Committee that spells out the requirements and expectations of an apprentice iron worker.

Apprentices are taught the proper use, care, and safe handling of the tools and equipment used in connection with their work and, of course, the important skills necessary to become a successful trades-person.

While working on-the-job and acquiring skills, apprentices are a regular part of the work force on whom contractors and co-workers rely. But remember that apprentices are also required to attend iron working school and complete the prescribed courses related to the trade in order to complement their on-the-job training. Apprentices will receive an evaluation about every 6 months to determine if they are learning the craft. If the on-the-job or schoolwork is not satisfactory, they may be dropped from the program or sent back to repeat that segment of training. If, however, the work is good they will receive a pay raise.

J.A.C. PROGRAM
Ironworkers Local 290 has been training apprentices since the late 1950’s. We take pride in turning out the best Ironworkers we possibly can. We will train you in every aspect of our trade from Architectural Ornamental Ironworking to Welding for Ironworkers, and everything in-between. Here at Local 290 we have a weld shop accredited by the American Welding Society and a Certified Welding Inspector on staff to train and certify all of our welders in our local.

The year 2015 is a monumental year for Local 290. We have switched to “Daytime Block Training” this year. Each apprentice will go to class from 7:30am until 3:00pm for 2 weeks and the go to work in the field for 3 ½ months until the next 2 weeks of training is necessary. Each apprentice will complete 6 weeks, 210 hours of training a year. They will do this for a total of 4 years after which they complete their completion test, will graduate to Journeyman status.

Application Process
To complete the Apprenticeship Application process you need to fill out the on-line application and then supply us with the following documentation.

1) High School Diploma or G.E.D.
2) Transcripts of Grades
3) Birth Certificate
4) Valid Driver’s License
5) Social Security Card
6) Resume (optional)
7) Signed Drug Test Consent Form (put a link to the form here)

You can fill out the application online from this link (put a link to the application here) Then once all your other documents are received we will be in contact with you to set up a time for you to complete an aptitude test and be interviewed. Once that is done you will be placed on a ranking list in order to be accepted into the program.

You can send your documents to:
Mike Yauger
4191 E. St. Rt. 40 Tipp City, Ohio 45371

You can also fax them to (937) 222-0913

You can download the Drug Test Consent Form  (put a link to the form here)and the Apprenticeship Application (put a link to the form here) from these links to Print out and sign them and mail all the documentation to our office.

Apprenticeship Program Staff

Apprenticeship / Training Coordinator -- Mike Yauger
Office: (937) 222-1622 ext 128

Instructor-- Edward Watson
Office: (937) 222-1622


To find out about the different classes and schedules please go to our Training Center page.

Click Here to fill out an Apprenticeship Application online

Click Here to upload and fill out an Apprenticeship Application

Click Here to upload and fill out the Drug Test Consent Form